Partial seasons have a payoff

Partial seasons have a payoff for the content holder.

Allow me to explain. Years ago I watched a show that I liked called WareHouse 13. Unfortunately they only had two episodes on Netflix, so I never watched past that. It seemed to be on TV but because I didn’t watch because it wasn’t a priority.

So yesterday I see it listed on Amazon Video. Now I don’t like Amazon at all, but I also am very curious about what happened. I also like the story line because it thoughtfully examines different ideas. So I paid the $29 to watch the season 4 and my curiosity is satisfied.

It makes sense that content makers want people to get a taste and then buy things. I don’t mind supporting them in this way. It has brought me lots more pleasure than $29 worth. I think more and more in the future what we will see are productions that are self funded and bypass the traditional gatekeepers.

You see this now with the incredible number of original programs by streaming services like Netflix and Hulu. Some things seem so inevitable, that you look back and it seems weird for it not to happen. Take the internet for example. We look back and wonder what life would be without it.

Many people share this sense of curiosity that I have. I am so glad I bought this season. It features Brent Spiner who was Data on Star Trek. He adds a charm and interesting variety to the show. In some ways the show seems to be grasping at straws by bringing in a big hitter like him, but its ok because I like his character.

When we like something we can forgive almost anything can’t we? I guess now I will be looking Amazon video over for other shows I might enjoy. I tend to like Netflix but Hulu had some good series as well. Why can’t they just have a service where you can pick exactly what you want?

 

New equipment sometimes means hurt feelings

New equipment sometimes means hurt feelings.

Let me give you an example. I once worked at a company that was pretty cheap. They didn’t spend money on regularly refreshing their equipment, so it was years old and very slow.

One day I was asked to upgrade some people to have two monitors instead of a tiny 15 inch one they had. As I did this, many people asked me if they were getting a monitor. I said that I had a list and only the people on the list got one. So there were lots of hurt feelings because they didn’t feel important enough to get a second monitor.

So guess what? A few days later one of the older monitors breaks. Now in any other company this would be an opportunity to just upgrade it with the new larger monitor. However in this case the political climate was to get the permission of their manager so that any hurt feelings could be addressed before this was done. Interesting isn’t it? Normally you would just replace something that is broken and let people deal with it as best they can.

In one way this is nice. It is nice that a company is aware of peoples feelings. In another way this is kind of treating people like children. Children don’t have the emotional capability of regulating their feelings like adults show, so you have to treat them more gently than an adult.

Of course the next day the monitor got replaced. However I see this happen in every company. Once someone gets something, everyone else seems to need it too.

It is a fascinating thing to watch. The person with the broken monitor said how terrible it would be if her monitor broke. Now that it did, she seemed kind of upset and nervous about the attention she would attract. She did attract attention.

It is ok to have feelings at work. However if your neighbor gets a new monitor or whatever, it doesn’t mean that you are less valuable. It just means people make decisions for reasons we aren’t always aware of.