A tale of 10 emails

I have been fortunate to have email for a long time. Since the late 90’s in fact. I thought it might be interesting to compare my email providers since I have just recently switched to a new email provider.

  1. Pine. This was a client I used during school that was just text and very ugly. However it was so cool because you could have friendships with people all around the world! I had many friendships with people all over the world, but unfortunately in those days email wasn’t very reliable so I lost track of them. Well it was a nice start to being international.
  2. Netscape email. Netscape was so beautiful compared to what Pine looked like. It had some neat features and was so easy to use. I spent years with Netscape.
  3. Eudora/Quarterdeck/Outlook Express. It’s true for those nerds out there that Quarterdeck was a chat client, but what a chat client it was! It was amazing in its time. Quarterdeck made some amazing software in the day. Eudora was cool and Outlook Express was awful. I was so glad to move to the next big thing.
  4. iTools then .Mac mail. These were apples failed attempts at email. This was later replaced by iCloud which was still a failure. I tried all of these services and stayed with them way past the point I should have. I kept hoping and Apple kept promising it would get better. It never did. Everything that could go wrong did with these services. Lost email, slowness, crashes, so on. I will never use any Mac email service again based on my experience for these 5 years.
  5. Web email like yahoo/gmail/other smaller providers. This was interesting but ultimately unsatisfying. Gmail always had irritating ads, and the loss of privacy just wasn’t worth it being free. My last email provider was Gmail, but I have grown tired of their privacy attitude and their sense of “don’t be evil” just isn’t factually true anymore. I am in the process of deleting my google account and never plan on doing business with them again.
  6. Exchange providers from Rackspace/Inmotion/other web hosting companies. Rackspace was fantastic and incredible for email. Even when gmail when down, Rackspace kept on working. They were the only ones with a true 100% uptime that I experienced with email. Inmotion also had great email but I didn’t use it very much since I was using gmail when I was a customer. Other web hosting companies aren’t worth mentioning since their reliability was unremarkable or bad.
  7. For testing purposes I tried Zoho, Protonmail, GMX and a bunch of other smaller providers. To me, they all had critical flaws. Zoho is ugly and its interface is overwhelming. I couldn’t suggest it to the average person. Protonmail had great privacy but it was ugly and overly complicated and not going to be worth its limitations which are currently 500 message limit a month for free. GMX was interesting, but ugly and I didn’t like the price structure.
  8. Using email from whatever client I was working for. Most clients want me on their email system so that I am easy to get ahold of for them. Often when you help people on projects they may want to send you a large file and being on their email system means that can send you incredibly large attachments and not worry about most email providers 10MB limit. So in this way I tried out many different exchange environments in companies and was mostly unimpressed. Most exchange environments tended to have performance issues especially on Monday morning, or mornings while people worked. I would not put my personal email on a clients system, so this wasn’t a good choice for me for personal use.
  9. Setting up a mail server and running it myself. No way. I am not that interested in email that I would take on this huge task for one person. In addition it doesn’t make financial sense in that I will never be an exchange only administrator and don’t want to commit my time to mastering this software. I have been an exchange administrator in the past, but it was one duty among many others and not my sole responsibility.
  10. Using an email address built into a social platform like Facebook. I am never going to join Facebook, so I wouldn’t do that just for email. LinkedIn can sync your email provider to their service, and then you send from LinkedIn via your outside email provider. This isn’t any good to me. They should have a native built-in email service that doesn’t require an outside email provider. Although I am not sure that I trust them with my personal information.

So what did I end up choosing? FastMail. It had an iOS client, it was $10 a year for the basic version-I am a light email user, it is beautifully done, it has features without being overwhelming, and it is most like Gmail for people who don’t like Gmail. I can feel good about recommending this to a non-technical person, and assist them if they can’t handle it. It was easy to import my information from gmail, and has some nice tools to import contacts, emails, calendars from many programs. They are not paying me, but so far it seems the best Gmail alternative.

LinkedIn Ads are watching you-how to opt out

LinkedIn Ads Will Now Follow You Around The Web. Here’s How To Opt Out – Consumerist.

When will advertisers learn that you have to opt-in people instead of forcing them to opt-out of ads? It is easy to do, but this shouldn’t need to be done for every advertising network. People need to learn to respect people’s privacy and ask for permission to sell to them.

As you may know there are hundreds of advertising companies that seek to place cookies or otherwise track your browsing behavior. Turning off cookies is not possible. Well it is, but then you can’t use most websites. The websites say that they can’t function without cookies, but they functioned just fine before cookies existed. It is clear that most websites rely on advertising which is unfortunate because it always taints the product. I worked at companies that derived their income from advertising revenue and advertising always affected editorial decisions.

There is nothing wrong or evil about advertising, but there is a time and a place for it. You don’t need to advertise to people who aren’t in a position to buy. That is just a waste of money and time. You don’t need to track people who don’t have disposable income, yet most advertising companies do track and collect this data. You don’t need to advertise to people with addictions or those with legally recognized issues, yet that is done as well. Isn’t it crazy that we have liquor and other addictive advertisements on TV to people who no willpower about them? Addictive things should be on a regulated channel that you have to prove you are medically healthy to receive. We put things that are not good for people on TV/radio/media and of course they cause addictions because they don’t have the strength to resist. Why do we value the almighty dollar more than our own happiness?