Lexmark has a funny way of working

I occasionally find friends who are seduced by a low price or just don’t know anything about the history of equipment. One person bought a Lexmark which I have only had problems with as a tech. This is another example of why Lexmark is a printer brand I avoid. I prefer Canon for home and HP printers for a business.

The Lexmark was a color laser printer and the print quality was average. It had gotten very slow to print and ultimately would fail to print, take a long time to print, or distort whatever was printed. I looked into it and had to call Lexmark for support since it was acting so strangely. It wouldn’t connect to the network and I couldn’t manage it through its physical controls. It turns out that you have to clear the NVRAM and reset the printer to factory defaults several times and let it reboot. So I test on the iPhone, iPad, laptop and everything works great. I go to the manager’s office with the printer and it fails to print from the iPhone and iPad and very slow on the laptop.

At this point after spending 3 hours on the issue, it is time to throw in the towel. It just isn’t worth investing this kind of time in. I discuss getting a new HP color laserjet and I get approval. I test it, install it and it works perfectly. Part of being a professional is knowing when to throw in the towel. In my opinion they should throw away the printer and I told them that. You don’t waste your life dealing with junk.

So why did I say Lexmark has a funny way of working? The Lexmark tech told me that this printer can either work and accept jobs wirelessly, or wired but it can’t do both. It had a Wireless access point at the top. This is completely different from any other printer that I have used. I have had the most experience with Airprint on HP devices and they worked great through a wireless network no matter what manner the signal was sent to them. Choose quality and simplify your life.

Book Review: Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise

Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone: Eric Klinenberg: 9780143122777: Amazon.com: Books. I liked this book. It gave lots of facts and interesting stories. I did feel at times that the approach wasn’t scientific, but it was clear he was trying.

Probably the biggest thing to be gained from this is that you should be aware of the risks of being single. Of course there are risks of being married as well. I find it interesting when in the stories people who had bad experiences allow that fear of loss to stop them from trying again. People are individuals, and what happened to them in the past isn’t a guarantee it will happen again. Hopefully we grow as people and make better choices.

The majority of reviewers rated this book positively, but I also agree with the few who rated it negatively. I can see that his bias of being married affected the way he approached this. I don’t think he had an agenda, but his personal values shined through the work. I am not judging him, but his attempt to be impartial was more imagined than real.

It is great that you acknowledge your bias, but it is better when you find a way to work against it. I like the scientific idea that you try to disprove something. I have found that challenging or disproving beliefs to be incredibly helpful. What seems on the surface to be true, is often not true. Take for example what color the sun is. I just learned recently that the sun isn’t yellow. All of my life I thought it was yellow. Apparently if it were yellow then the clouds would be yellow as well. I didn’t think it through but after reading that scientific explanation it makes sense. The way things appear to be are rarely the way things really are.